Test taking tips

Did you know that in true/false questions, there are most questions that have a true response than a false one? Did you know that a good night of sleep is more beneficial than a night without sleep and cramming? Did you know that questions with extremes such as always and never tend to be false?Test Taking Skills

Before the test:

  • Study throughout the semester. Plan study time instead of cramming.
  • Get plenty of sleep.
  • Eat good food.
  • Stay up to date on all assignments -both reading and homework.
  • Visit your professor or teacher to clarify any confusing points.
  • Practice test taking skills.
  • Get practice tests or old tests of the material.
  • Arrive early for the test and listen carefully to instructions.
  • Create a positive attitude and envision good results.
  • Use acronyms.
  • Evaluate and grade all practice tests.

The test:

  • Read the instructions!
  • Plan your test time by estimating how much time it should take to do each section.
  • Take a quick look at the test.
  • Do the easiest questions first to boost confidence. Then, do the harder ones.
  • Do not leave the problems worth the most points for the end.
  • Highlight units (such as inches or centimeters) in problems so you don’t make a simple error.
  • Draw a diagram when needed. (Or chart. Or table.)
  • Never leave a question blank.
  • Plan to finish early to leave time for review.
Multiple choice:
  • Before solving the problem, remove all of the answers that would be ridiculous.
  • Eliminate additional answers to increase chances for the right response.
  • Check the units in the answers. (For instance inches if the question is about gallons.)
  • Never leave a question blank.

By Tracy Atkinson

Tracy Atkinson, mother of six, lives in the Midwest with her husband. She is a teacher, having taught elementary school to higher education, holding degrees in elementary education and a master’s in higher education. Her passion is researching, studying and investigating the attributes related to self-directed learners. She has published several titles, including Calais: The Annals of the Hidden, Lemosa: The Annals of the Hidden, Book Two, Rachel’s 8 and Securing Your Tent. She is currently working on a non-fiction text exploring the attributes of self-directed learners: The Five Characteristics of Self-directed Learners.

Tracy Harrington-Atkinson

Tracy Harrington-Atkinson, mother of six, lives in the mid-west with her husband. She loved storytelling and sharing her stories with her children. As they grew, she started writing her stories down for them. She is a teacher, having taught from elementary school to higher education, holding degrees in elementary education, masters in higher education and continued on to a PhD in curriculum design. Her husband, Kerry and Tracy breed miniature dachshunds and love to spend time with their growing family. She has published several books including Calais: The Annals of the Hidden, Rachel's 8 and Securing Your Tent.